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Links of the Week: crises on social media


LEWIS
Published on November 09, 2012
By LEWIS

This week has proven to be an interesting one for social media crises; the unfortunate recent events in the United States saw American Apparel come under fire for appearing to capitalise on Hurricane Sandy to share details regarding a clothing promotion. Yet the social media slip-ups show no signs of abating; in the sprit of the seminal blog post by Jeremiah Owyang listing a range of brands that got 'punk'd' on social media, here is a list of the top three: Walmart employees filmed damaging iPads [youtube]http://youtu.be/L_DLJK4o2YM[/youtube] The larger your company is, the harder it is to control what employees do on social platforms. Especially when they perform criminal acts during the course of work, film them, and put them on YouTube. Similar to the hard lessons initially learned by those at Domino's Pizza, it can be a challenge to plan for all eventualities, especially when those acts are outside of the realm of common reason. Read more here...   Kitchen Aid apologises for Tweet about Obama's grandmother The kitchen appliance company sparked a Twitterstorm after a member of the company's Twitter team reportedly sent a comment about Obama's late grandmother on the company handle instead of their personal one. The company quickly deleted the Tweet, as well as sending out a statement apologising. Read more here...   Woman removed from Ryanair flight for having more than one item of hand luggage [youtube]http://youtu.be/2fFgSPBTHOg[/youtube] Spanish police have been filmed forcibly removing a woman from a flight after being spotted carrying a book and a scroll that did not fit into her hand luggage. Whether the company intended to make the luggage restrictions as draconian as to exclude avid readers remains to be seen, but a spokesman for the company did respond to state that “This passenger was in breach of airport security regulations, and having become disruptive was properly removed from the aircraft at the request of Ryanair agents”. It can be risky taking a non-apologetic approach, especially if they upset a customer with social media savvy, as the famous video by musician David Carroll proves.

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